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ohstarstuff:

What You Need to Know About Mars Comet Siding Spring

  • On Sunday, October 19th, Comet C/2013 A1, aka Siding Spring, will pass within about 87,000 miles of the Red Planet.

  • The distance the comet will be from Mars is less than half the distance between Earth and our moon and less than one-tenth the distance of any known comet flyby of Earth.

  • Siding Spring, whose core is 0.5 to 5 miles wide, probably formed somewhere between Jupiter and Neptune about 4.6 billion years ago — just a few million years after the solar system began coming together. Scientists believe Siding Spring had a close encounter with one of these planets and was booted out into the Oort Cloud

  • A million years ago or so, a star passing by the Oort Cloud is thought to have jolted the comet’s orbit again, sending it on its first-ever trip into the inner solar system.

  • Comets from the Oort cloud are both ancient and rare. Since this is Comet Siding Spring’s first trip through the inner solar system, scientists are excited to learn more about its composition and the effects of its gas and dust on the Mars upper atmosphere.

  • NASA does not think the comet hit the Red Planet, but comets spew out a trail of dust and gas, and that could damage the fleet of spacecraft orbiting Mars. Just to be safe, NASA will move the Mars Odyssey orbiter, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), and the new Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) to the other side of the planet as the comet approaches.

  • The Mars orbiters will take pictures and collect data on the comet as it flys by. Several Earth-based and space telescopes, including the Hubble Space Telescope, also will take pictures. Here is the full list of NASA assets observing Siding Spring

  • The comet was first discovered in January 2013 by Robert McNaught at the Siding Spring Observatory in Australia.

  • Great article from Space.com on how to view the comet from Earth 

(Source: mars.nasa.gov)

comaniddy:

All About That Bass (Science Parody)

Join me as we parody Meghan Trainor’s hit song ‘All About That Bass.’

This SciTune is about things like the grand scale of the universe, accepting Pluto’s as a dwarf planet, knowing that we are all made of star stuff, and more.

It’s like the Cosmos meets Pop Music.

[Watch The Video]

All About That Bass - Space Parody

Hi Sci Friends!

I need your help to make my latest video, All About That Space, even more popular!

All you have to do is head over to Cheezburger and place a vote. The more votes it gets, the better! And don’t worry, no registration is required.

And if you want to help even more, spread the word by sharing the link on all your social medias.

Thanks and let’s make this video go viral!

jtotheizzoe:

NEW VIDEO!!!

I’ve got my head in the clouds… (see what I did there?!)

In this week’s It’s Okay To Be Smart, you’ll learn how clouds stay aloft despite weighing more than jumbo jets, where the term “cloud nine” comes from, why clouds are *literally* alive inside, meet the only person to ever live inside a cloud, and find out what cloud names have to do with Harry Potter spells. It’s a big ball of fluffy, wet, sciencey goodness!

Bonus: This one also features some really fun “homework” that involves laying around looking at clouds (but in a whole new way), so hopefully you check out that part of the video and then send in your completed assignments by tagging me on Instagram :)

If you like my videos, please consider subscribing on YouTube and sharing with your cloud-loving friends!

Watch the whole video below:

Get your heads in the clouds with this episode of It’s Okay To Be Smart. Joe explains the science of those white puffs in the sky.

All About That Bass (Science Parody)

Join me as we parody Meghan Trainor’s hit song ‘All About That Bass.’

This SciTune is about things like the grand scale of the universe, accepting Pluto’s as a dwarf planet, knowing that we are all made of star stuff, and more.

It’s like the Cosmos meets Pop Music.

[Watch The Video]

(Source: youtube.com)

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